Six Interesting Facts That Nobody Told You About ‘Sleep And Dreams’ Revealed By Sleep Experts.

By Festus Omobude

Sleep is an essential need for the restoration of physical and mental strength, sleep experts at the Australian company The Goodnight. Co recently revealed the top facts about sleep and dreams.

‘So many questions come to mind when we think about sleep and what we’ve found out may surprise you,’ they wrote.

1. STAYING UP ALL NIGHT MAKES YOUR BODY ‘DRUNK’.

Various research studies have been conducted – Australian study has found that 17 – 19 hours without sleep, makes the body’s performance equal to an alcoholic with a Blood alcohol level (BAC) of 0.05%. Response speed and accuracy tests were much lower at this alcohol level when measured. One might think that spending the last minute of cramming and not sleeping for 16 hours before entering the exam hall is resourceful, but this has been found to put one at the risk of rendering poor judgment and causing the reduced response to the stimulus.

2. EVERYBODY DREAMS EVERY NIGHT.

Everybody dreams four to seven times every night – fact. You can’t remember them, you’re not alone. Most people forget 90 percent of their dreams,’ Goodnight Co. wrote.

As a general rule, dreams fade quickly after waking. The electrical signals and chemical signatures that constitute the experience of the dream may disappear as wakefulness ensues, they wrote.

It is possible for elements of the dream to be recalled later in the day, perhaps triggered by an experience that reactivates the same area of the brain that created the dream overnight. It is more likely that dreams will be remembered if your state of REM sleep is fragmented. Alarm clocks notoriously interrupt REM sleep towards morning.

3. SHIFTS WORKERS ARE MORE LIKELY TO FALL ILL.

Chronic illnesses, cardiovascular problems, and gastroenteric diseases can affect shift workers due to a conditioned sleep disorder known as a circadian rhythm sleep disorder. This is because the person follows a schedule outside the normal 9 pm to 5 am required sleep.

Circadian rhythm refers to the 24hr rhythmic output of the human biological clock,’ the Sleep Foundation reports.

It is considered a disorder because of the frequency with which people suffer from sleep disturbance and excessive sleepiness in trying to adapt to a shift work schedule.

4. THE STRANGERS FOUND IN DREAMS ARE REAL PEOPLE.

An individual person could encounter dozens or even hundreds of human faces on a daily basis from commuting to and from school or work, or from seeing people on the news or in television and movies, Erica Seigneur of the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, said.

Most of these people will remain strangers to our conscious selves, but their faces and figures will still be perceived and processed by our brains. Because of this, it would be impossible to say for certain that you had never seen a person or face outside of your dream before.

She did add, however, that while this theory cannot be tested in a ‘meaningful or accurate way’ it is ‘more likely that our sleeping brain recycles previously seen faces rather than creating new ones’.

5. BLIND PEOPLE CAN ONLY HEAR SOUNDS IN DREAMS BUT CANNOT SEE PEOPLE.

Blind people are more likely to report feelings of touch, taste, and smell in their dreams compared to sighted people’. This likely corresponds to their waking experience which relies more on these senses. Nikola Zekic, who was born blind, said his dreams consisted of sounds mostly.

‘As a child, I would often dream that I was falling. I would just keep falling all night long. I used to like it because it made me feel like I was flying.

6. THERE ARE VARYING SLEEP NEEDS FOR DIFFERENT SLEEP.

AGES. 2015 New guidelines released by the National Sleep Foundation

  • Newborns (0 to 3 months): 14 to 17 hours
  • Infants (4 to 11 months): 12 to 15 hours
  • Toddlers (1 to 2 years): 11 to 14 hours
  • Preschoolers (3 to 5 years): 10 to 13 hours
  • School-age children (6 to 13 years): 9 to 11 hours
  • Teenagers (14 to 17 years): 8 to 10 hours 
  • Younger adults (18 to 25 years): 7 to 9 hours
  • Adults (26 to 64 years): 7 to 9 hours
  • Older adults (65+ years): 7 to 8 hours 

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